About The Author

My photo

Daughter of the King - born from above in 1989.

Deborah grew up in a military family and moved to Florida in the early 1970's.  She began her journey of creative writing soon after coming to know Jesus as her personal Savior. Her primary goal is to share her personal testimony with others while bringing hope and practical help through her writing.

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Empty Tomb to Full Heart... What Does Easter Mean to You?

And can it be that I should gain
An interest in the Savior's blood?
Died He for me, who caused His pain?
For me, who Him to death pursued?

   Amazing love! how can it be
   That Thou, my Lord, shouldst die for me?
                      [Charles Wesley  1780]

She was freed from seven devils by the power of Jesus, and joined the women who accompanied the disciples, caring for their needs.  She was from Magdala, on the Southwest coast of the Sea of Galilee. 

She could not comprehend how this Prophet whom the disciples called "The Son of God" would show her such unmerited kindness and mercy.  How could she ever repay Him?

She remembered how Simon Peter spoke of a parable that Jesus taught of two debtors, saying, "There was a certain creditor who had two debtors. One owed five hundred denarii, and the other fifty. And when they had nothing with which to repay, he freely forgave them both. Tell Me, therefore, which of them will love him more?"  Simon answered Him and said, "I suppose the one whom he forgave more."  And Jesus said to him, "You have rightly judged."  

Jesus spoke this of the women who had anointed His feet with a costly flask of fragrant oil during a dinner in a Pharisee's house. He continued the parable, saying to Simon and the others, "Therefore I say to you, her sins, which are many, are forgiven, for she loved much.  But to whom little is forgiven, the same loves little."

She watched as the Lord and His disciples traveled throughout Galilee and the surrounding area performing miracles and ministering to the masses.  She observed firsthand how the crowds grew in anticipation of a conquering King... then as they began to fall away when their expectations didn't materialize.  

Who was this Jesus Who had commanded the demons to flee and the Spirit of God to come into her heart? 

Mary recalled as He often withdrew privately to pray to His Father.  She remembered how He taught with authority and wisdom, confounding the lawyers and Pharisees.  He had preached to all who would listen, often late into the day.  She and the others frequently heard the parables Jesus shared as He instructed the people in the ways of righteousness and Kingdom living.

Then she relived the horrors of the days leading up to His crucifixion with the criminals. She remembered the humiliation and pain and gore that surrounded His death. Her tears and those of His mother Mary, as well as the other women who witnessed the Roman punishment had been bitter and frequent since that day.  

When Joseph of Arimathea and Nichodemus secured His body from Pilate, they took the strips of linen with the spices as was the custom of the Jews to prepare Him for burial.  Mary also went with the wife of Clopas (Mary) and Salome the mother of James and John with spices to the tomb to pay homage to the slain Son of God..


On the Sabbath - the first day of the week, Mary of Magdala came to the tomb early in the morning, while it was still dark, and saw that the stone had been taken away. She ran and came to Simon Peter and John - crying and pleading with them - asking where her Lord had been taken.  They both ran to the tomb. John peered into the tomb first, as Peter went inside and discovered the linen cloths and handkerchief lying on the stone.



Mary remembers the pain in her heart as she longed to see her Savior as she stood outside by the empty tomb. She recalled the encounter with the two heavenly messengers clothed in white as they sat - one at the head and the other at the feet, where the body of Jesus had laid. They asked her why she was weeping, and Mary said to them, "Because they have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid Him."

She heard Jesus say to her, "Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you seeking?"  And then she said to Him, supposing Him to be the gardener, "Sir, if You have carried Him away, tell me where You have laid Him, and I will take Him away."

Mary then grinned as she recalled her response to His reply, "Mary!" with her heartfelt shout of, "Rabboni!". 

Yes - Mary's heart was filled with gratitude and amazement as she gazed into heaven while He ascended to His Father. That was a day she would never forget...

(Scripture references:  Luke 7:40-47; John 19:38-42; John 20:1-18)

What about you?  As we celebrate Resurrection Sunday - what is your response to the Lord?  What does Easter mean to you personally?




Be refreshed and encouraged by this wonderful song 











Deborah is the author of a Christian non-fiction book titled “Mission Possible”. It is written for women who love the Lord Jesus, but their spouse doesn’t share their passion.  It will encourage and challenge the reader to embrace God’s promises for their spouse and future together. 



If you have been encouraged by this post - please take time to share it with others.

Share/Bookmark

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Deborah - A Portrait of the First Woman Judge (Part 2)

This is a continuation from last week - If you missed it, here's a link to   PART 1

Deborah had just received an imperative from the Lord to take up arms against the Canaanite king and relayed it to Barak son of Abinoam.

However, Barak hesitated and insisted that Deborah go with him into battle.  We are not told why he would make such a request.  Some speculate that it was his way of showing her high esteem as a prophetess and judge.  Others see it as a weak and immature plea.  

The men in the region were lacking in leadership skills as evidenced by Deborah’s judgeship.  No matter the reason – she agreed to go with him.  Her presence would also inspire the troops.  Nevertheless, Barak would receive no glory for the battle’s success or the deliverance of the Canaanite general into their hands.

This assault was the first united action since the initial conquest of Canaan. God was with Deborah and Barak as they hailed their troops and rallied men of valor to flush out Sisera.  God caused a great storm to sweep into the valley and rendered Sisera’s chariots useless in the thick mud.  Israel’s foot soldiers rushed the Canaanites and they were swept away in a flash-flood. Barak continued to pursue Sisera with the sword as did his vast army.

When Sisera fled on foot, he came to the tent of Jael, the wife of Heber the Kenite.  He thought he had safe refuge from the battle because of a treaty, but when Jael gave him a meal that filled his belly and a blanket for warmth, it caused him to fall into a deep sleep. She then took a tent peg and drove it into his temple as he slumbered.  Thus the glory went to a woman for the general’s death, just a Deborah had prophesied.

Deborah took great care and devotion concerning her calling from God to lead the Israelites during this time in history.  

She was revered and feared – not because she was ruthless, but because she was faithful to her office and responsibilities.  She reminds me of Solomon when he ruled and settled disputes during his reign in Israel (I Kings 4:29).

Judges 4:24 tells us, “And the hand of the children of Israel grew stronger and stronger against Jabin king of Canaan, until they had destroyed Jabin king of Canaan.”  

"Deborah beneath the Palm Tree"
by James J Tissot

Next we see Deborah and Barak singing a psalm of praise to God for their success.  This song recants the recent victory by the hand of God, and reiterates how two foreigners had a part in rescuing His people from destruction.  It also mentions how some of the tribes of Israel rose to the occasion by accepting their call to battle, while the others were missing in action.  Divine intervention and nature’s wrath ensured the enemy’s defeat, while taking advantage of something as simple as an act of hospitality to set up the opposing general’s demise.

God blesses obedience as evidenced by the forty peaceful years that followed that unusual but effective battle plan devised in the heavenly realm.  Deborah indeed facilitated a great victory that day and assured a prominent place among women in Scripture whom God used to fulfill His plans for His chosen people.

One last thought… As I pondered the name Deborah and its Hebrew meaning (bee), I envisioned a “bee hive” and how the worker bees hover nearby, surrounding the Queen.  That brought to mind the vision in Isaiah and in Ezekiel of the heavenly creatures circling God’s Throne – singing, “Holy, Holy, Holy!”, as they worship the King of Heaven.

How awesome our God is that He would showcase a woman of valor among so many women of renown in Scripture. 


Since I am a "Deborah" - I am celebrating my Birthday during the month of March with a special of only .99 cents for my book MISSION POSSIBLE on Smashwords as an eBook. You can choose from several different formats including ePub, Mobi, .Pdf, etc. compatible with most e-Readers including Kindle and Nook.


You can visit my Smashwords page here:  MISSION POSSIBLE



Happy Birthday to me...






Deborah is the author of a Christian non-fiction book titled “Mission Possible”. It is written for women who love the Lord Jesus, but their spouse doesn’t share their passion.  It will encourage and challenge the reader to embrace God’s promises for their spouse and future together. 



If you have been encouraged by this post - please take time to share it with others.

Share/Bookmark

Friday, March 8, 2013

Deborah - A Portrait of the First Woman Judge (Part 1)

This post is in response to a "request" from a friend.  And, since my BIRTHDAY is in March, I wanted to oblige her.

The name Deborah in Hebrew means “bee”.  What does that have to do with the first woman Judge?  I’m not really sure – but I know what my husband says about me: “You never sit still – you’re always buzzing about like a bumble-bee!”

I was named by my parents in the mid 1950’s when Deborah was a popular name for movie stars and national celebrities.  Only God knew at the time of my conception that I would one day call Him Lord and Savior.  He alone knew the weight and significance of my name.

But – I am writing this post about another Deborah.  The woman I am profiling is found in God’s Word in Judges 4-5.

The book of Judges in the Bible is one of intrigue and adventure.  We read about the deterioration of Israel and her failure to complete the conquest of Canaan after the death of Joshua.  Israel was ruled by Judges who were military and civil leaders during a time of spiritual darkness and rebellion.  Each judge is a savior and a ruler, a spiritual and political deliverer.

We know very little from Scripture about Deborah.  She was known for her wisdom and courage.  She is the only woman in the Old Testament who gained renown according to her own merit and not because of her standing with a man.  Deborah lived sometime around 1150 B.C., nearly 100 years after the Hebrews entered Canaan.

Chapter 4 begins with the children of Israel being “sold” into the hand of Jabin king of Canaan, who brutally oppressed them for twenty years.  What we do know begins in Judges 4:4 which tells us, “Now Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, was judging Israel at that time.”  A prophet in the Old Testament spoke forth God’s Word which was often preceded by prayer and meditation.

Study notes in the Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB) tell us, “Given their patriarchal culture, it is a measure of the poor state to which Israel had been reduced that they were being judged by a woman – a point emphasized in the Hebrew text, which piles up four feminine nouns at the beginning of the sentence [Deborah, a woman, a prophetess, the wife of Lappidoth].”

"Deborah beneath the Palm Tree"
by James J Tissot
Deborah routinely sat under the Palm Tree of Deborah between Rahah and Bethel in the hill country of Ephraim where the Israelites would come to her for judgment.  This particular palm tree was most likely named for Rebekah’s nurse Deborah, who was buried nearby (Genesis 35:8).  It is intriguing that in the region of Ephraim, named after the younger son of Joseph who received the blessing from Jacob (Genesis 48:1-22) rich fertile soil, abundant rainfall and fruitful hills defined its territory.  However, it would also become the arena for the Hebrew nation’s humiliation and apostasy before their mighty deliverance from the Canaanites.


Upon receiving her instructions from God, Deborah summoned Barak son of Abinoam and declared to him that indeed God had commanded him to, ‘Go, deploy the troops on Mount Tabor, and take with you 10,000 men from the Naphtalites and Zebulunites.’  He was to confront Jabin’s general, Sisera, who led an army made up of 900 iron chariots.  She would lure Sisera to the River Kishon on the plains below the mountain, and thus Barak’s victory was assured according to God’s plan.  He merely had to obey.
This post will continue next week in  
Deborah - A Portrait of the First Woman Judge (Part 2)


Since I am a "Deborah" - I am celebrating my Birthday during the month of March with a special of only .99 cents for my book MISSION POSSIBLE on Smashwords as an eBook. You can choose from several different formats including ePub, Mobi, .Pdf, etc. compatible with most e-Readers including Kindle and Nook.



You can visit my Smashwords page here:   MISSION POSSIBLE

HAPPY BIRTHDAY to me !




Deborah is the author of a Christian non-fiction book titled “Mission Possible”. It is written for women who love the Lord Jesus, but their spouse doesn’t share their passion.  It will encourage and challenge the reader to embrace God’s promises for their spouse and future together. 


If you have been encouraged by this post - please take time to share it with others.

Share/Bookmark

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails